Jakarta (JFT)

Jakarta (JFT)

Things to do - general

Capital of the Republic of Indonesia, Jakarta is a huge, sprawling metropolitan city with a population of more than 9 million people.  Jakarta is the seat of national government as well as seat of the provincial government of Greater Jakarta. Here is also the national Parliament, the Supreme Court and the Constitutional Court. This city is moreover the country’s center of finance and business. It is the center of the nation’s economics and politics as here converge people from all over Indonesia, attracting people from all walks of life.  Jakarta is also the center of Indonesia’s modern music and sound, and center of Indonesia’s lively creative industry.  It is no wonder, therefore, that whatever happens in Jakarta is national interest and it is for these reasons that Jakarta is the hub of Indonesia’s modern history and modern life.

Jakarta was where Indonesia proclaimed Independence on 17 August 1945 initiated by the National Awakening Movement in 1908 and the Youth Movement against colonialism since 1928.  Jakarta was also where the ongoing Indonesian Reform movement started in 1997. Jakarta, formerly known as Batavia, was the seat of the Dutch East India company, VOC, and later of the colonial government over the then Dutch East Indies.

Located on the north coast on the western part of the island of Java, the Province of Greater Jakarta today comprises of 6 municipalities, namely Central Jakarta which includes the Merdeka Square and the elite residential area of Menteng; South Jakarta, which includes the districts of Kebayoran and Bintaro; West Jakarta, now being developed into a prime municipality where Jakarta’s tallest building and hotel will be constructed; East Jakarta, location of the Indonesia in Miniature Park as well as many industrial estates; North Jakarta, the city’s prime trading area and site of Jakarta’s beach recreation Ancol Dreamland; and the Thousand Islands, some 76 idyllic islands lying in the Bay of Jakarta.

In fact, there are a lot of things to do and to see in Jakarta. But travel-wise, Jakarta is difficult to get around because of the dense car and motorbike population. The best advice for visitors is to stay in a hotel in an area where you will spend most of your time for conferences or business meetings, for shopping or exhibitions, while allowing time for exploring the city or for sightseeing to particular days only when one has more time to spare.

Because of its huge population, Jakarta is dense. Therefore one finds justaposed here luxurious houses next to road-side shacks, and state-of-the art cars fighting for space with dilapidated buses. But the city is very dynamic and full of life during the day and well into the night.

Here one finds restaurants serving international cuisine or regional dishes from the archipelago, ranging from exclusive restaurants to road-side stalls to satisfy everyone’s taste buds. There are also a number of beautiful golf courses around the city, where Indonesian and foreign businessmen spend entire weekends.

Jakarta’s nightlife is second to none. Discos, nightclubs, music rooms in top class hotels or stand-alone offer a wide variety of music and dance opportunities. The annual Java Jazz Festival is the international event for jazz buffs. Indonesia’s best bands and singing stars all live in this great city.

Jakarta is, moreover, a great place for shopping, and is able to compete in choice and price with many favourite shopping cities around the world like Singapore and Hong Kong. The Plaza Indonesia, Plaza Senayan, Pondok Indah Mall, Pacific Place, are just a few of the plethora of upscale shopping centers found across this huge city. While for bargain rates, Tanah Abang wholesale center, Mangga Dua and Kelapa Gading are favourite shopping haunts. Yearly the Jakarta Great Sale offers huge discounts attracting thousands of shoppers from the provinces and South East Asia.

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Country Indonesia
Area 740 KM2
Languages spoken Bahasa Indonesia
Currency Rupiah
Visa requirements Required

Sports and nature

Jakarta is a metropolitan city, but jakarta has a good zoo and park. Ragunan, It has almost 30,000 plants from 250 different kinds of. Since it is a combination between zoo and park, Ragunan Zoo is also known as Ragunan Zoological Park. Ragunan Zoo was constructed based on the open zoo concept that allowed visitors to feel nearer to the animals. Besides being a recreation park, Ragunan Zoo has an important role in animal conservation through the cultivation program, and it also becomes a good place for educational and research activities. Some animals that have been successfully cultivated in Ragunan Zoo are white tiger, Sumatran tiger, orang utan, komodo, phyton, and some types of birds (i.e kakatua bird, parrot, and cassowary) as well as other kind of animals.

Nightlife

Nightlife Jakarta is a strange juxtaposition of being the capital of the world’s largest Islamic country, but at the same time its nightlife is also one of the most vibrant in the Asia Pacific region. From hanging out with the “chi chi” in an upscale lounge, to exploring the seediest discos, or just grabbing a beer at the local sports bar, Jakarta offers a wide selection of over 200 bars, clubs, pubs and lounges scattered across the entire city to cater to every whim and preference. Bars in the Central Business District To hang out with Jakarta's young, rich and beautiful, try the Red Square in the Plaza Senayan Arcadia annex, reported to be Jakarta’s first vodka bar and restaurant and which is very popular with expats in the city. X2 Club nearby is also a place to see and be seen, although some say that it has lost some of its luster recently, but still the music and cocktails are excellent. The Hard Rock Café in Plaza Indonesia is an old favorite for burgers and fries, with a live music band on most weekends. Cazbar in Mega Kuningan, just behind the Ritz Carlton Hotel, also offers a local sports bar like atmosphere that is a nice, relatively quiet spot to hang out over a beer and on slow weekday evenings. Jaya Pub in the Jaya Building, probably the oldest pub in town, models itself after the old pubs in Amsterdam and is a great way to blend a little Batavian culture with a good beer. If you are looking for a place for a good, quiet glass of wine, check out the Cork and Screw, a bistro and wine bar in Kuningan and another location in Plaza Indonesia. Known for its good food and even better wine selection, Cork and Screw is arguably one of the most affordable wine bars in the city today. Bars and Clubs in Kemang The fashionable Kemang area in South Jakarta is popular with expats and locals alike. It has numerous places to explore for haute cuisine, excellent cocktails and to dance the night away. Casa, a small bar and restaurant in Kemang, is a haunt for creative types, and trendy in its own restrained way. Nu China is a club and bar that is currently popular with college types. Clubs and Bars in Blok M A nightlife district popular among single expats is Blok M in South Jakarta, or more specifically Jalan Palatehan 1, a single lane just north of the bus terminal which is packed full of pubs, bars and clubs geared almost squarely towards the single Western male expat. Clubs and Bars in North Jakarta Segarra is an outdoor lounge by the sea in the Ancol resort area of North Jakarta that is a world away from the grim of the city. With an amazingly unique beach bar atmosphere that you wouldn’t find anywhere else in Jakarta, you can relax while chilling on a sofa in the sea breeze or on one of the lounge chairs that dot the deck along the shore. Be sure to avoid the Kota area in North Jakarta, considered to be the seediest part of town after midnight. If you must explore just for the sake of trying it once, we suggest you restrict yourself to the regular discos in Kota, such as Stadium and Crown, but, even so, these clubs have special areas designated for prostitutes. Some Tips To address some practicalities, night life in Jakarta does tend towards the pricey end, for local living standards at least. In general, dress codes are strictly enforced in most bars and clubs in the city: dress sharply, or at the very least smart casual and definitely no shorts or slippers. During Ramadan, the holy Muslim fasting month, all nightlife ends at midnight and some operations close for the entire month. When going out clubbing in Jakarta, be aware that a fairly high number of working girls, known in local parlance as “ayam”, congregate in certain bars, so much so that many "non-ayam" female clientele often get mistaken for being on the take. So be careful when going out as a female in the city; it's always go in groups.

Culture and history

Culture & history The "Betawi" (Orang Betawi, or "people of Batavia") are the descendants of the people living in and around Batavia and recognized as an ethnic group from around the 18th–19th century. The Betawi people are mostly descended from various Southeast-Asian ethnic groups brought or attracted to Batavia to meet labor needs, and include people from different parts of Indonesia.[52] The language and Betawi culture are distinct from those of the Sundanese or Javanese, forming itself as a language island in the surrounding area. The language is mostly based on the East Malay dialect and enriched by loan words from Dutch, Portuguese, Sundanese, Javanese, Minangkabau, Chinese, and Arabic. Nowadays, the Jakarta dialect (Bahasa Jakarta), used as a street language by people in Jakarta, is loosely based on the Betawi language. Betawi arts have a low profile in Jakarta, and most Betawi have moved to the suburbs of Jakarta, displaced by new migrants. It is easier to find Java or Minang based wedding ceremonies rather than Betawi weddings in Jakarta. It is easier to find Javanese Gamelan instead of Gambang Kromong (a mixture between Betawi and Chinese music) or Tanjidor (a mixture between Betawi and Portuguese music) or Marawis (a mixture between Betawi and Yaman music). However, some festivals such as the Jalan Jaksa Festival or Kemang Festival include efforts to preserve Betawi arts by inviting artists to give performances.[53] There has been a significant Chinese community in Jakarta for many centuries. The Chinese in Jakarta traditionally reside around old urban areas, such as Pinangsia, Pluit and Glodok (Jakarta Chinatown) areas. They also can be found in old chinatowns of Senen and Jatinegara. Officially, they make up 5.5% of the Jakartan population, although this number may be under-reported.[54] Chinese culture also had influenced Betawi culture, such as the popularity of Chinese cakes and sweets, firecrackers, to Betawi wedding attire that demonstrates Chinese and Arab influences. Jakarta has several performing art centres, such as the classical concert hall Aula Simfonia Jakarta in Kemayoran, Taman Ismail Marzuki (TIM) art centre in Cikini, Gedung Kesenian Jakarta near Pasar Baru, Balai Sarbini in Plaza Semanggi area, Bentara Budaya Jakarta in Palmerah area, Pasar Seni (Art Market) in Ancol, and traditional Indonesian art performances at the pavilions of some provinces in Taman Mini Indonesia Indah. Traditional music is often found at high-class hotels, including Wayang and Gamelan performances. Javanese Wayang Orang performances can be found at Wayang Orang Bharata theater near Senen bus terminal. As the nation's largest city and capital, Jakarta has lured much national and regional talent who hope to find a greater audience and more opportunities for success. Jakarta hosts several prestigious art and culture festivals, and exhibitions, such as the annual Jakarta International Film Festival (JiFFest), Jakarta International Java Jazz Festival, Jakarta Fashion Week, Jakarta Fashion & Food Festival (JFFF), Jakarta Fair, Indonesia Creative Products and Jakarta Arts and Crafts exhibition. Flona Jakarta is a flora-and-fauna exhibition, held annually in August at Lapangan Banteng Park, featuring flowers, plant nurseries, and pets. The Jakarta Fair is held annually from mid-June to mid-July to celebrate the anniversary of the city and is largely centred around a trade fair. However this month-long fair also features entertainment, including arts and music performances by local bands and musicians. Several foreign art and culture centres are also established in Jakarta, and mainly serve to promote culture and language through learning centres, libraries, and art galleries. Among these foreign art and cultural centres are China Confucius Institute, Netherlands Erasmus Huis, UK British Council, France Centre Culturel Français, Germany Goethe-Institut, Japan Foundation, and the Jawaharlal Nehru Indian Cultural Centre.

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